Focus on fodder beet

Published Wednesday, 29th May 2019 in SAC Consulting news

Sugar beet has a larger yield potential than any other forage crop grown in the UK
Fodder beet has a larger yield potential than any other forage crop grown in the UK

Experts from SAC Consulting, part of SRUC, will be taking part in a free website focussing on how Scottish growers can maximise the potential of fodder beet.

The hour long webinar on Wednesday 5 June will explain trials currently being undertaken on five Monitor Farms – Borders, Sutherland, Lochaber, Shetland and Angus.

Project facilitator, Kirsten Williams from SAC Consulting, will explain the ‘action research’ project focussing on fodder beet currently being run by the Monitor Farm Scotland initiative.

She will then be joined by Dr Alex Sinclair, senior consultant and soil and nutrient specialist from SAC Consulting, to discuss the nutrient requirements of the growing crop, including nitrogen requirements, salt reactions in the soil and timings for applying trace elements.

This webinar is part of a series that will be held as part of this farmer-led action research project, funded through the Monitor Farm Scotland innovation pot, which is exploring ways to collate and share information on farming activities.

Through the fodder beet trials, the team will develop a much-needed knowledge repository on growing fodder beet, covering all of the growing stages, which then can be used by farmers from across Scotland who are looking to grow a winter forage crop.

Kirsten said: “Fodder beet offers many potential benefits to livestock producers in Scotland, the largest of which is the yield potential, which is larger than any other forage crop grown in the UK. 

“The high yield potential gives the crop the ability to be the cheapest forage per kg of dry matter, while the excellent nutrition gives it the ability to be the cheapest forage per mega joule of energy. 

“Achieving the yield in a cost-effective manner is key to maximising the potential of the crop.” 

Sign up for the webinar.

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