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SRUC researchers work on new £8.6m greenhouse gas programme

Published Wednesday, 3rd May 2017 in Research news

Greenhouse gases image

SRUC researchers are co-investigators on a new £8.6 m research programme to investigate ways to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere to counteract global warming.

Staff from both the Land Economy, Environment and Society and Future Farming Systems research groups are involved in the recently awarded National Environment Research Council (NERC) project led by Aberdeen University.

The project – known as Soils-R-GRREAT; Soils research to deliver greenhouse gas removals and abatement technologies - is part of a major new research program to investigate the potential of negative greenhouse gas emissions technologies.

Soils-R-GRREAT will analyse the global potential for soil-based greenhouse gas removal, and how this varies by practice and region.

This will include investigating the economic social, cultural and ecological impacts; current policies that prevent implementation; and future policies that may enable wider adoption, managing risks, and integration with other greenhouse gas removal approaches.

SRUC’s input will mainly be addressing the economic potential of soils as a greenhouse gas mitigation measure.

The project will run for three years with other partners from Edinburgh, Cranfield and Newcastle Universities, James Hutton Institute and CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

Professor Dominic Moran of SRUC’s Land Economy & Environment Research Group said: “SRUC’s involvement in this project reflects our strengths in interdisciplinary science on climate change and the land based sector.

“In particular our input builds on a decade of policy driven research focussing on the economics of greenhouse gas reduction in agricultural production and food consumption.”

Photo caption: SRUC’s input will mainly be addressing the economic potential of soils as a greenhouse gas mitigation measure.

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