2013: Family Estates and Rural Resilience

2013: Family Estates Can Support Rural Resilience

‘Resilience’ is a strong feature of Scottish Government policy. For example, Outcome 11 of the National Performance Framework states that “We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others”.

Research which can throw light on ways to enhance resilience in rural Scotland can feed into policy and practice thinking. Our aim, in this report, is to explore the links between the management and decision-making of family estates, and wider rural (community) resilience.

This is phase two of a three-phase research project. In Phase One (2011), we examined the governance and decision-making of community-owned estates and their contribution to the resilience of Scotland’s rural communities. In Phase Three (2014/2015), we will be looking at estates owned and managed by charities. A total overview will be produced once Phase Three is complete.

In this project, a total of 23 family estate owners were randomly selected for interview, across Scotland and across size categories. We explored:

  1. What do estate owners do and why?
  2. How do estates remain strong and adaptable?
  3. Who do estate owners engage with and why?
  4. Should estates be expected to deliver to wider rural development objectives?
  5. What needs to change for private estates to deliver more?
  6. Key messages for policy and practice.

This research was undertaken within the Scottish Government-commissioned Research Programme (2011-2016) “Vibrant Rural Communities: Governance and Decision-Making for Community Empowerment”.

If you would like more information about this work please contact the author using the details provided below.

Download Research Reports

Report and Research Briefing - Phase One: 2011: Community Land Ownership and Community Resilience

Report - Phase Two: 2013 Family estates and rural resilience

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